Tag Archives: toddler

Little Toasty Toes 2

Following general pattern for Little Toasty Toes. Notes are at bottom of pattern page for these (referred to as “off white ones”). https://bitosweets.wordpress.com/2012/11/02/little-toasty-toes/

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Little Toasty Toes

It was pointed out to me that if I make slippers for anyone I’d better be sure and make at least two extra pair in a size to fit two girls who are both two years old. I tried making a pocketbook slipper in their size. It fit but needs some altering for the instep area. In the mean time, I decided to whip something up for them that I thought they may like. They did, especially after they were felted. I didn’t take a picture of them after felting but will request one from my daughters so I can share. These will fit a size 7, quite loosely but not dangling loose before felting. They become more snug but, still roomy, after felting.

Here they are before felting,

Toasty Toes Mary Jane Slippers

Materials List
4, U.S. size 9 dpns (double pointed needles)
Less than 50 grams of chunky yarn
(The variegated ones were made with Plymouth Galway Chunky Paint (bulky weight), (see below for other options)
1 marker
Darning needle

2- ⅝”buttons
(or, 2 complete snap closures or, velcro closures)
Scissors

Instructions

Cast on 3 sts

(You will be working in the round so be sure stitches are not twisted and connect stitches by continuing on with the work and not turning)

Round 1

Place marker to indicate end/beginning of row. You will need to slip marker after last stitch and before working first stitch of the next round while working in the round.

k1fb onto a dpn (this will be needle 1), k1fb onto another dpn (needle 2), k1fb onto a third dpn (needle 3) -(6 sts total-2 on each needle)

Round 2

k1fb in each st around – (12 sts total-4 on each needle)

Round 3

needle 1 – k1, k1fb in next 2 sts, k1.

needle 2 – k1, k1fb in next 2 sts, k1.

needle 3 – k1, k1fb in next 2 sts, k1.

(18 sts total-6 on each needle)

Round 4

needle 1 – k1, k1fb, k2, k1fb, k1

needle 2 – k1, k1fb, k2, k1fb, k1

needle 3 – k1, k1fb, k2, k1fb, k1

(24 sts total-8 on each needle)

Round 5-12

work all 3 needles in k1, p1 ribbing. (24 sts total)

Round 13

needle 1- k2 (the first of which will remain while the 2nd one will be used when binding off 6 sts), bind 6 sts. Place last st onto needle 2 to be worked with the others and the first st from needle 1 can be placed onto the end of needle 3. You will no longer need the marker. Work all remaining sts, including the already worked 1st st from needle one that was placed on the end of needle three (I didn’t notice any quirky issues from that stitch having the additional work) in k1, p1 ribbing following set pattern of previous rounds. At this time, the stitches may be worked straight on just two needles. (18 sts total)

Row 14 -28

Work in k1, p1 (or p1, k1-doesn’t matter as long as the ribbing pattern has been established and your row count is accurate) ribbing following pattern set by previous rounds. (18 sts total)

Row 29

(The inside of the slipper should be facing you as you begin this row)

Purl across

Row 30

(this is actually only going to be a half row)

k 9 sts. Leave remaining 9 sts unworked. Leaving a long (10-12 inches) tail, cut yarn.

Thread end of yarn that is attached to slipper through darning needle. Fold the piece in half so that the two needles and the stitches line up and the right sides are together. Seam the two halves of the back of slipper together using the Kitchener stitch (helpful video tutorial on the Kitchener stitch).

Strap

(the strap length will vary depending on the pudginess of the intended wearer’s foot.)

Decide where you’d like the strap to be.

With outside of shoe facing you, pick up 5 sts.

slip 1st st of each row.

Work in k1, p1 ribbing (take care to p1,k1 on alternate rows).

Work in ribbing until strap reaches just beyond top edge of opposite side of slipper if wanting to use a button closure.(Feel free to use your favorite buttonhole method)

knit or purl first st, bo 3 sts, knit or purl last st. Turn.

knit or purl first stitch, cast on 3 stitches, knit or purl last stitch. Work 1-2 more rows. Bind off.

If using snaps or velcro closures, measure to midway on the opposite side of slipper and bind off

(the off-white ones were made with Fisherman’s yarn( aran weight), ( it being a lighter weight yarn than is the chunky, adjustments were made by making increases to 12 sts per dpn and, 12 rounds of k1 p1 rib pattern) -both the Plymouth and the Fisherman’s are 100% wool- if felting is desired, choose 100% wool yarn that is NOT superwash)

Disclaimer:

While there are many patterns for Mary Jane-type slippers available, the pattern for these slippers was created by me. I do believe I have included all details. Please, don’t hesitate to let me know if you find something amok.

Another Knitted Dress

    This time I used size 3 100% mercerized cotton, in white.  After the top was finished, I dyed it with Rit’s sunshine orange (thought it’d be gold like that on the bottle but, it wound up being an incredible orange which matched another color in the fabric so I wasn’t bummed at all…actually, I like the boldness of the color more than the thought of the gold), and allowed it to air dry.  The buttons were covered in some of the same fabric.  This was made using the same pattern as the previous version ( http://setcieboutique.canalblog.com/archives/modeles_gratuits___free_patterns/index.html (the site is in a language other than english but there is an english version of the pattern…scroll down until you find it)).

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Ooooo, I like!

     Just a short bit ago, I worked on numerous knit and crochet items in red.  While making the sweater, Baby Sophisticate by Linden Down, I thought it’d be adorable in pink with a black fuzzy/furry collar and trim (my first thought was that long eyelash, wispy type yarn but considering the age of the wearer, I opted for the shorter eyelash chenille.  The youtube video for pockets was very beneficial when it came to adding them to this sweater. The buttons were made to match using polymer clay.

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So, There Was This Dress, see…

…and I just couldn’t not make it. Matter of fact, I lost sight of what I was actually supposed to be doing in order to complete it.

It wound up being a faster project than I expected. Yaaaaay!

Sandrine Bianco’s Summer Dress Pattern Direct link to the pdf of the English version of the pattern Please be aware although the pattern isn’t at all difficult it may prompt a bit of head scratchin’ and HUH? Do a WHAAAAAAT? and maybe even unraveling a time or two ’cause you wound up with 8 short at the end of the dividing row, it’ll click eventually.

So far behind

 The plan was to finish up outstanding projects but instead, I have started others along the way.  Some of the new projects, as well as some of the old (er) projects have been completed.  I can’t say that I’m completely satisfied with how they turned out but, I now know how to make those less than ideal items better should I decide to attempt them again.  (I tried to make a small bench/box without measurements beforehand.  I need to take a photo of that one to share for sure…we all could use a laugh from time to time, right?)

 

 

 
 
      The pink and brown jumper was my most recent project.  It was completed in less than 3 days.  It started out to be this dress .  I followed the pattern and wound up unraveling it twice due to sizing issues.  Since I wasn’t up to dickering with the stitches, I opted to save that pattern for another day and embark on a creation of my own.  It began with a crocheted rope or cord that was made long enough to go around the subject (my granddaughter) at mid chest area (think empire waist).  Then, working in the loops along one edge of the rope/cord, and using the shell pattern from the dress originally planned, I made the skirt portion, working back and forth for several rows before connecting and working in the round.  After finishing off the skirt, I began the bodice.  I made another rope/cord long enough for the neckline.  Working in the loops along one edge and with this type pattern in mind, made the bodice to fit her, working back and forth or side to side (however it’s termed working from one edge to the other).  When the bodice was long enough, I attached it to the skirt and continued on to the pants (minus the waistband), again, working side to side until the length of the opening lined up the the opening of the skirt.  Then, worked them in the round.  I made a few decreases while doing the legs to taper them a bit.  Basic bow with contrasting disc were made and attached to one side of back.  A length of rope/cord was made and attached to opposite side from the bows at back opening so that there were two loops large enough to fit the bows through snugly…the bows and loops were the closures.
     I’m sorry I don’t have a pattern for it but, patterns, like the ones above (hyperlinks), were pieced together to create it.
 
     The  sweater (you may have to sign up (it’s free) for the pattern), including the assembly time,  is one of  the easiest, fastest working pattern I have ever made.  It can definitely be completed in one good (good = a long stretch of  time to devote to the project only) day.
 
     The pants can be completed so quickly that, as long as the pattern is followed, one can have several pairs made by the end of the day (given, the day has been a good one).
 
    

     The black and green pants were made with the same pattern but instead of making a ribbing at the bottom of each leg, I incorporated a version of the crocodile stitch.
 
    

     I still need to tidy up my tails of yarn and add a closure to the black sweater.  I’m all for all in one designs…little or no piece work and fast working ones, like this one, are ideal for gifts and make for a productive donation season as well.
 
     I absolutely LOVE the pattern for the hat with the lattice looking pattern!  I kept buying yarn just so I could see it in another color!  I did have problems with the pattern.  The problems were actually with me, the reader, and not the pattern.  The pattern is perfect as is.  If you try it, there may be some trouble areas around row 5 and again at row 7.  If you find yourself getting aggravated ’cause it just ain’t workin’…unravel it to the point before it jumped track, put the piece down and REREAD the pattern sloooooooowly.  The pattern is gorgeous and well worth the time it takes to understand and complete it.  I know not everyone has difficulty with it but for those who do, know the trouble is not in the pattern.
 
   The hat with the cables and posts  is a fast working, interesting pattern as is the other hat pattern by the same creator.  I love all of her hat patterns!
 
     The afghan below was made using the beautiful pattern from yarncrazy.com and an absurd amount of green and rust colored yarn I had in my yarn box and had so long I don’t even know why I bought it.

Other Sweets (the inedible kind)

After seeing this beautiful yoke pattern, I decided to give it a try.  I had to do a bit of adjusting of the pattern because I was wanting it to fit a 15 month old little girl.  For the most part, the part that counts, the stitch pattern, it is the same….just not as big.  It wound up being incredibly easy to follow and an insanely fast project…the crocheted yoke, that is.  After finishing the yoke, I searched for more yoke patterns and came upon Regina Gees blogspot.  She’d successfully, and quite beautifully combined a completed yoke, from the above pattern, to fabric for the perfect Summer dress.

I wound up making a second one.  I was so excited about the pattern that I made the first one before getting my grand daughter’s measurements.  The first was about 3″ shy of her chest width.  I couldnt’ bring myself to unravel it.  I think I’ll add something to each end to extend it.

The yoke that is laying on top of the pink fabric is the first one.  I took a shot of it so you can see it opened.  I wanted it to meet in the middle of the back and attach buttons so it would be easier to get on and off.  I think I’ll make a few more in other colors.

 

Here are my renditions of the yoke and the dress (and a little purse, to hold important stuff, to match):