Tag Archives: slippers

Little Toasty Toes

It was pointed out to me that if I make slippers for anyone I’d better be sure and make at least two extra pair in a size to fit two girls who are both two years old. I tried making a pocketbook slipper in their size. It fit but needs some altering for the instep area. In the mean time, I decided to whip something up for them that I thought they may like. They did, especially after they were felted. I didn’t take a picture of them after felting but will request one from my daughters so I can share. These will fit a size 7, quite loosely but not dangling loose before felting. They become more snug but, still roomy, after felting.

Here they are before felting,

Toasty Toes Mary Jane Slippers

Materials List
4, U.S. size 9 dpns (double pointed needles)
Less than 50 grams of chunky yarn
(The variegated ones were made with Plymouth Galway Chunky Paint (bulky weight), (see below for other options)
1 marker
Darning needle

2- ⅝”buttons
(or, 2 complete snap closures or, velcro closures)
Scissors

Instructions

Cast on 3 sts

(You will be working in the round so be sure stitches are not twisted and connect stitches by continuing on with the work and not turning)

Round 1

Place marker to indicate end/beginning of row. You will need to slip marker after last stitch and before working first stitch of the next round while working in the round.

k1fb onto a dpn (this will be needle 1), k1fb onto another dpn (needle 2), k1fb onto a third dpn (needle 3) -(6 sts total-2 on each needle)

Round 2

k1fb in each st around – (12 sts total-4 on each needle)

Round 3

needle 1 – k1, k1fb in next 2 sts, k1.

needle 2 – k1, k1fb in next 2 sts, k1.

needle 3 – k1, k1fb in next 2 sts, k1.

(18 sts total-6 on each needle)

Round 4

needle 1 – k1, k1fb, k2, k1fb, k1

needle 2 – k1, k1fb, k2, k1fb, k1

needle 3 – k1, k1fb, k2, k1fb, k1

(24 sts total-8 on each needle)

Round 5-12

work all 3 needles in k1, p1 ribbing. (24 sts total)

Round 13

needle 1- k2 (the first of which will remain while the 2nd one will be used when binding off 6 sts), bind 6 sts. Place last st onto needle 2 to be worked with the others and the first st from needle 1 can be placed onto the end of needle 3. You will no longer need the marker. Work all remaining sts, including the already worked 1st st from needle one that was placed on the end of needle three (I didn’t notice any quirky issues from that stitch having the additional work) in k1, p1 ribbing following set pattern of previous rounds. At this time, the stitches may be worked straight on just two needles. (18 sts total)

Row 14 -28

Work in k1, p1 (or p1, k1-doesn’t matter as long as the ribbing pattern has been established and your row count is accurate) ribbing following pattern set by previous rounds. (18 sts total)

Row 29

(The inside of the slipper should be facing you as you begin this row)

Purl across

Row 30

(this is actually only going to be a half row)

k 9 sts. Leave remaining 9 sts unworked. Leaving a long (10-12 inches) tail, cut yarn.

Thread end of yarn that is attached to slipper through darning needle. Fold the piece in half so that the two needles and the stitches line up and the right sides are together. Seam the two halves of the back of slipper together using the Kitchener stitch (helpful video tutorial on the Kitchener stitch).

Strap

(the strap length will vary depending on the pudginess of the intended wearer’s foot.)

Decide where you’d like the strap to be.

With outside of shoe facing you, pick up 5 sts.

slip 1st st of each row.

Work in k1, p1 ribbing (take care to p1,k1 on alternate rows).

Work in ribbing until strap reaches just beyond top edge of opposite side of slipper if wanting to use a button closure.(Feel free to use your favorite buttonhole method)

knit or purl first st, bo 3 sts, knit or purl last st. Turn.

knit or purl first stitch, cast on 3 stitches, knit or purl last stitch. Work 1-2 more rows. Bind off.

If using snaps or velcro closures, measure to midway on the opposite side of slipper and bind off

(the off-white ones were made with Fisherman’s yarn( aran weight), ( it being a lighter weight yarn than is the chunky, adjustments were made by making increases to 12 sts per dpn and, 12 rounds of k1 p1 rib pattern) -both the Plymouth and the Fisherman’s are 100% wool- if felting is desired, choose 100% wool yarn that is NOT superwash)

Disclaimer:

While there are many patterns for Mary Jane-type slippers available, the pattern for these slippers was created by me. I do believe I have included all details. Please, don’t hesitate to let me know if you find something amok.

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Pocketbook Slippers

Up until about a week ago, I thought pocketbook slippers were so named because they could be easily tucked into a pocketbook. When I finally seen them in their flattened state I realized maybe they were so named because they look like mini pocketbooks. Regardless of how they got their name, they are incredibly easy to make and will make an ideal donation project for the homeless shelters and rest homes.
Although these don’t have them yet, I think I will add the puffy paint dots to the bottoms of these as I’d done with my sister’s slippers. My sister loved her’s by the way.
The pattern for the slippers and the pattern for the daisies came from . and

Warm Feet

      My sister has been dealing with cancer since January. She’s gone through chemotherapy and a surgery and is now facing another round of chemotherapy treatments. While going through her first round of treatments, she experienced, among many things, exceptionally cold fingers and toes as well as overall chills. I made her a quick oversized sweater and a pair of slippers to help keep her warm. When I found out she had to go through another round, I got started on some more slippers/socks.  This time, I put gripper dots (puffy paint) on the soles to keep her from slipping when she wore them.

     The black ones were knitted using bulky acrylic yarn and a pattern I made up as I went (I will try to get it written down but it is pretty basic I think…figure 8 cast on, increasing to comfortable foot size and working back to heel area and working in a heel(without gusset). So, there’s absolutely no stitching involved) and added leaves and, a wool flower from the Blooming Rose pattern by Veronica O’neill which I think will felt nicely when washed. The socks were made with 100% wool (an aran weight and a sock weight strand held together). My daughter said they remind her of “Zebra gum” (Fruit Stripe gum). I used the Chunky Knit Slipper Socks pattern provided by Cynthia Miller on Ravelry.com. Both, the pattern for the Blooming Rose and the Chunky Knit Slipper socks were free patterns and I am ever so grateful for the generosity of those contributors.

Seeing Red!

While taking advantage of some super ebay auctions on yarn I wound up with quite an abundance of red Red Heart yarn. It didn’t seem like such a bad thing until I gathered it all up to continue with my projects. I only thought I was sick of pink. I will happily go back to pink (if I had to) after I’m done with all the red. I was tootlin’ along in my needlework, using various colors but the red, in its’ vast pile, loomed over me like a menacing cloud…the red cloud of doom. I HAD to do something to reduce the amount of it, and soon. I first thought to just hide it but, like any other messes, you still know they’re there and they must be dealt with and the longer you wait, the larger they seem. Well, I have put a dent in it and will now work on something else, coming back to the red periodically. Gosh! It was all still a good deal and I am glad I got it. I reckon I’d feel the same had it been all of any color.

Afghan (actually, a pillowghan) made using Chris Simon’s 12×12 square flower burst pattern

The shawl-collared sweater (2y/o) was made using the pattern shared by Linden Down on Ravelry for the Baby Sophisticate

The large slippers used the crocheted moccasin pattern shared by Umme Yusuf, also on Ravelry.com

Smaller slippers made using Thistles and Tulips Crochet’s Bella Slipper pattern and the hat, one of my favorite crocheted hat patterns, is shared by Sarah Arnold at rheatheylia.com